Monday, March 25, 2013

Garburator, eh?

So, did you know that the word "garburator" is only used in Canada? Maybe you don't even know what a garburator is. Otherwise known as a garbage disposal unit , it churns up any bits of food in your sink and flushes them down the drain. And we have one, or at least, we had one. It has never really worked beyond emitting a high pitched "eeeeee" sound, plus we've always been skeptical of pureeing all those food scraps and sending them down into the sewer. David Suzuki says no to garburators. Anyway, yesterday I broke it. Which is fine, since it was broken to begin with, but, BUT! I also broke the dishwasher dun dun DUN! There was a big spark and little ding and then it was all over.

I'm just going to go housewife for a moment to say that I really truly love my dishwasher. Plus, Patrick and I figured out yesterday that we have actually never lived together without a dishwasher. It is possible that this is a marital crisis. This could be what is holding us together! (Correlation/causation fail).

I promptly called Jim and Dave's Appliances this morning, but had some communication difficulties when it came to describing the problem with the garburator. "What's a garburator? I've never heard of that" said receptionist Mary. Which of course sent me googling around, and now I know. It's a Canadian thing. Anyway, hopefully it will all soon be straightened out, now that I've got the terminology down.
In other Oh Canada news, Heiko loves his French book about Les Couleurs that we got in Quebec City. He especially loves the red page -- Du rouge dans la ville -- and always turns back to look at that page no matter how enticing we think the Dans le jardin vert clair or L'hiver tout blanc pages are. Look how happy he is once he's navigated back there! By the way, fire trucks go Pin-pon! in French.
We are hoping to help little H learn some French, or at least some French sounds oui oui in the next few years. We're in the market for some new Frenchy board books, and some musique! Also in the market for improved French for maman, but that is a different story, isn't it?

8 comments:

  1. The daycare we are leaning towards (absurd, I know since we don't even have a baby yet) told us that they speak Spanish with the babies, and asked if that was ok. I am so pleased that someone will take the responsibility to teach my child another language, which will be an improvement from the semi-French and semi-Urdu he can expect from his parents.

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    1. Yah! Spanish! That does sound like a great idea. Will your daycare be near your home or near work?

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    2. Near work! Brooklyn daycares are way more affordable than in Manhattan!

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  2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tF1xFI02i8

    Too bad radio-canada won't let americans listen to the original.

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    1. so cute! I don't remember this one, but no time like the present to learn it

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    2. It's the theme for passe-partout! Didn't you watch it in French class? Probably the best way to learn Quebecois French.

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  3. I think "garburator" is the first word I learned was different between Canadian and American English back when I started at UBC. Interesting little factoids, eh?

    And HEIKO IS SO ADORABLE. But I suppose we all knew that already.

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    1. Ha, that is funny, Mike. I can't actually think of too many other differences, apart from pronunciation, of course. I guess there is the restroom/washroom thing. And also the pop/soda/coke triality. Oh, and beanie/touque.

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